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Seminar Series


Weekly: MPCB 101- 1:30 pm to 2:20 pm


Friday, February 17, 2017

Meagan Boll, Boise State University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Title: “Determining the Role Played by the MTN Enzyme in the Virulence of Hemorrhagic E. coli 

Savannah Irving, Boise State University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Title: “Investigation into the Synthesis and Oxidative Properties of Colloidal C60”


Friday, February 10, 2017

Jonathan Prince, Boise State University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Title: “An Investigation Into the Accuracy of Thermochemical Data Derived From the Weizmann Methods”

Kelsey Skluzacek, Boise State University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Title: “Structure-based drug design of novel therapeutics targeting metastatic breast cancer”


Friday, February 3, 2017

Ashley Poppe, Boise State University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Title: “Acyl-substrate Recognition in the Binding and Chemical Steps of BmaI1 in Burkholderia mallei


Friday, January 20, 2017

T. Leo Liu, Utah State University, Department of Chemistry &  Biochemistry
Title: “Redox Flow Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage
Abstract: At first, a brief introduction will be given to highlight basic information about Utah State University and ongoing education and research activities in the Department of Chemistry at USU. The rest of the presentation will cover my group research efforts in developing high energy density and low cost battery systems aiming for large-scale energy storage from sustainable sources. Beyond traditional battery systems such as Li-ion batteries and lead-acid batteries etc., redox flow batteries are highly attractive and promising technologies because of their high energy and/or power densities, low costs, and operation safety. Challenges and advances in developing redox flow batteries for practical applications will be discussed. Particularly, how chemistry plays crucial roles in developing the new generations of redox flow batteries will be emphasized.
Biography: Dr. Tianbiao Leo Liu received his Ph.D from Texas A&M University in 2009, served as staff scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory from 2013 to 2015, and is currently an assistant professor at Utah State University. His research is broadly spread on energy and green chemistry including electrocatalysis, electrochemical energy storage, and environmentally benign chemical transformations.